Selections from Cobbett's Political Works; Being a Complete Abridgement of the 100 Volumes Which Comprise the Writings of "Porcupine" and the "Weekly Political Register." with Notes, Historical and Explanatory Volume 4

Selections from Cobbett's Political Works; Being a Complete Abridgement of the 100 Volumes Which Comprise the Writings of "Porcupine" and the "Weekly Political Register." with Notes, Historical and Explanatory Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ...and this manure to come? I beg Rusticus to attend to this question. I wish to know from him, what is the source from which he would draw the labour and the manure necessary to bring these new lands into a productive state. It is very easy, in riding across commons, and forests, and downs, to exclaim: "What a pity that all this land should lie uncultivated, while so many poor creatures are in want of bread!" This is very easy, requiring nothing more than a slight exertion of the lungs, unloaded with any particle of thought. But to show how the cultivation of these lands would add to the quantity of bread, demands much greater powers of argument than I have ever met with in any person who took that side of the subject. Rusticus will observe, that I am always speaking of wastes in general, and not of wastes, in the neighbourhood of which, local circumstances present artificial aid. These particular and partial instance.-, have nothing to do with the general question. I return, therefore, to the charge, and again ask him, from what source he would draw the means of putting the wastes of the kingdom into a state to make them produce corn? These means consist of labour and manure, or rather, they consist simply of labour, for every one must perceive, that manure itself is the consequence of labour. Whence, then, is the labour to come to dig ditches, to make banks and fences round waste lands, to make roads through them, to pare and burn, and plough, and drag, and harrow, and cart chalk, and lime, and marl, and clay, and dung, and, "at last, to sow these waste lands? WHENCE, I, once more, ask, is this labour to come? He will allow, 1 suppose, that the labourers in England are all employed now. He must allow this, or else he will have...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 314 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 562g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236582608
  • 9781236582607