A Select Collection of Valuable and Curious Arts, and Interesting Experiments; Which Are Well Explained and Warranted Genuine, and May Be Performed Easily, Safely, and at Little Expense

A Select Collection of Valuable and Curious Arts, and Interesting Experiments; Which Are Well Explained and Warranted Genuine, and May Be Performed Easily, Safely, and at Little Expense

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1826 edition. Excerpt: ... fix a border of wax round the plate, and pour on diluted nitric acid. In about one minute, pour f the acid, and wash the plate with clear water, but without affecting the varnish.--dry the plate, and apply the varnish to such, parts of the design as arc intended to have but a faint shade; then apply the acid for a minute or two longer. Thus proceed biting in, and stopping out alternately, till every part of the design has acquired its proper shade. But if any part requires a darker shade than the ground, the powdered rosin may be removed from such parts with a scraper. When the plate has become sufficiently corroded, the varnish may be washed off with oil, or spirits of turpentine, and the plate may be cleansed with whiting. b. Copper-plate Printing.--The paper on which impressions Irom a copper-plate are to be taken, should be moistened, or wet down two or three days previous to printing; this is performed by dipping the sheets in water severally, and then laying them all together under a heavy weight till they are used. When the paper is ready, the copper-plate may be warmed over a chafing dish of coals, and the engraved side completely covered and all the lines filled with common printing ink, or ink made of Frankfort black, finely ground in old linseed toil. This may be done by means of a printing ball, or the ink may be spread on the plate with a smooth stiff brush. The plate may then be wiped with apiece of linen or cotton cloth, and afterward with the hand, being passed slowly but hardly over the plate to take off all the ink except what remains in the lines of the engraving; to accomplish which more effectually, the hand may be rubbed occasionally with dry whiting. When the plate is thoroughly cleaned of the redundant...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123685165X
  • 9781236851659