Second Report of the Provost Marshal General to the Secretary of War on the Operations of the Selective Service System to December 20, 1918

Second Report of the Provost Marshal General to the Secretary of War on the Operations of the Selective Service System to December 20, 1918

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 edition. Excerpt: ...the final classification card, and must exhibit the same when called upon to do so by any local or district board member or police official. Desertion is, of course, an offense by military law. State and Federal police officers are by statute authorized to arrest without warrant deserters from the Army and Navy of the United States, and a reward of $50 is payable for the apprehension and delivery to military control of each draft deserter who is physically qualified for military service and whose offense the local board finds to have been willful. In addition, failure to perform any duty imposed by the selective service act or the regulations made thereunder, is a misdemeanor, punishable by fine and imprisonment. The Bureau of Investigation of the Department of Justice is charged by statute with the detection and prosecution of crimes against the United States. Federal and State police officers alike have been very diligent in apprehending slackers, delinquents, and deserters. The agents of the Bureau of Investigation of the Department of Justice have been pioneers in this work. They have been ably assisted by State police officers, by the military and naval intelligence bureaus, by local and district board members, and by certain volunteer organizations, notably the American Protective League, working both in cooperation with the Department of Justice and independently. The United States attorneys have submitted reports to the Department of Jtistice showing that more than 10,000 prosecutions for failure to register had been instituted on or before June 30, 1918. It has been the policy of the Department of Justice to prosecute only when the failure to register appears to have been clearly willful. Up to that date the agents of the Bureau of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 186 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 340g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236555139
  • 9781236555137