The Second Jungle Book

The Second Jungle Book

3.82 (2,405 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

The Second Jungle Book is a sequel to The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling. First published in 1895, it features 16 stories about Mowgli, all but one set in India, most of which Kipling wrote while living in Vermont. Here are the stories and songs of Kipling's second JUNGLE BOOK: tales of Mowgli and his Seeonee Wolf-Pack and, of course, Akela the wolf; of Bagheera, the panther; Kaa, the Rock Python; Baloo, the Bear; and so many others. They are the tales of Mowgli, the lost boy raised by wolves in the jungles of India, brought up on a diet of Jungle Law, loyalty, and fresh meat from the kill, and they have captivated children and adults alike for generations. There is no better place to learn the life of the wolf pack and the natural order -- the natural justice -- of life in the jungle. And who could ever forget Mowgli's enemy, Shere Khan, the bragadocious Bengal tiger? To say nothing of Rikki-tikki-tavi, the mongoose?This second volume presents the further adventures of Mowgli, including the tale of his biological parents, cast out by their village for their connection to a demon child.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 116 pages
  • 152.4 x 228.6 x 6.86mm | 231.33g
  • Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1514637375
  • 9781514637371

About Rudyard Kipling

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (30 December 1865 - 18 January 1936) was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old. Kipling's works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888). His poems include "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" (1919), "The White Man's Burden" (1899), and "If-" (1910). He is regarded as a major innovator in the art of the short story; his children's books are classics of children's literature; and one critic described his work as exhibiting "a versatile and luminous narrative gift." In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and its youngest recipient to date. Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on several occasions for a knighthood, all of which he declined.show more

Rating details

2,405 ratings
3.82 out of 5 stars
5 31% (741)
4 33% (788)
3 27% (643)
2 7% (169)
1 3% (64)
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