The Search for Social Salvation

The Search for Social Salvation : Social Christianity and America, 1880-1925

By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

In their studies of social Christianity, scholars of American religion have devoted critical attention to a group of theologically liberal pastors, primarily in the Northeast. Gary Scott Smith attempts to paint a more complete picture of the movement. Smith's ambitious and thorough study amply demonstrates how social Christianity-which included blacks, women, Southerners, and Westerners-worked to solve industrial, political, and urban problems; reduce racial discrimination; increase the status of women; curb drunkenness and prostitution; strengthen the family; upgrade public schools; and raise the quality of public health. In his analysis of the available scholarship and case studies of individuals, organizations, and campaigns central to the movement, Smith makes a convincing case that social Christianity was the most widespread, long-lasting, and influential religious social reform movement in American history.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 560 pages
  • 158 x 235 x 35mm | 862g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD, United States
  • English
  • bibliography, index
  • 073910196X
  • 9780739101964

About Gary Scott Smith

Gary Scott Smith is Professor of History at Grove City College. He is the editor of Worldviews, Society, and Ethics: A Reader (1999).show more

Table of contents

Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 Reassessing Social Christianity: Participants and Purposes Chapter 3 When Stead Came to Chicago: Social Christianity and Political Reform Chapter 4 Charles Sheldon's In His Steps and the Social Gospel Novel Chapter 5 To Reconstruct the World: Walter Rauschenbusch, Christian Socialism, and Social Change Chapter 6 Women and Social Christianity: Vida Scudder's Quest to Create a Cooperative Commonwealth Chapter 7 Blacks and Social Christianity: Reverdy Ransom, a Champion of Black Civil Rights Chapter 8 Social Christianity, Businessmen, and the Golden Rule: John Wanamaker, John J. Eagan, and Arthur Nash Chapter 9 Social Christianity, Businessmen, and the Golden Rule II: Nelson O. Nelson and Samuel M. Jones Chapter 10 Evangelicals and Social Christianity: The Men and Religion Forward Movement of 1911-1912 Chapter 11 Conservative Critics of Social Christianity Chapter 12 Toward a New Definition of Social Christianity: Advocates, Activities, Principles, and Achievements Chapter 13 Appendix: Social Christianity in White Protestant Denominations, 1180-1925show more