The Sea and Its Living Wonders; A Popular Account of the Marvels of the Deep and of the Progress of Maritime Discovery from the Earliest Ages to the Present Time

The Sea and Its Living Wonders; A Popular Account of the Marvels of the Deep and of the Progress of Maritime Discovery from the Earliest Ages to the Present Time

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...evening and at night on the surface of the seas, but sink to a greater depth, or retire into the crevices of the rocks, as soon as the sun rises above the horizon. Some are of a recluse disposition, and lead a solitary life in the anfractuosities of the littoral zone; others, of a more social temper, wander in large troops along the shores, or over the vast plains of ocean. Possessing the organs of sense, and the means of locomotion in a high degree of development, the cephalopods may naturally be expected to be far more active and intelligent than the inferior orders of the molluscs On moonlight nights, among HABITS OF THE CEPHALOPODS. 277 the islands of the Indian Archipelago, Mr. Adams frequently observed the Sepiae and Octopi in full predatory activity, and had considerable difficulty and trouble in securing them, so great was their restless vivacity, and so vigorous their endeavours to escape. "They dart from side to side of the pools," says the naturalist in his entertaining and instructive account of his journey to those distant gems of the tropical sea, "or fix themselves so tenaciously to the surface of the stones by means of their suckers that it requires great force and strength to detach them. Even when removed and thrown upon the sand, they progress rapidly, in a sidelong shuffling manner, throwing about their long arms, ejecting their ink-like fluid in sudden violent jets, and staring about with their big shining eyes (which at night appear luminous, like a cat's) in a very grotesque and hideous manner." At the Cape de Verd islands, Mr. C. Darwin was also much amused by the various arts to escape detection used by a cuttle-fish, which seemed fully aware that he was watching it. Remaining for a time motionless, it...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 196 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 358g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236624920
  • 9781236624925