The Scottish Gael; Being an Historical and Descriptive Account of the Inhabitants, Antiquities, and National Peculiarities of Scotland

The Scottish Gael; Being an Historical and Descriptive Account of the Inhabitants, Antiquities, and National Peculiarities of Scotland : More Particularly of the Northern, or Gaelic Parts of the Country, Where the Singular Habits Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1831 edition. Excerpt: ...the living to extol the virtues of former heroes as an excitement to their imitation, but was reckoned extremely pleasing to the deceased--it was indeed thought the means of assisting the spirit to a state of happiness, and became consequently a religious duty. But even where this superstition has no influence, an elegy on a deceased friend continues to gratify the human mind, and the example of virtue seldom fails to inspire youth with a generous spirit of emulation. Eginhart celebrates Charlemagne for committing to writing and to memory the songs on the wars and heroic virtues of his predecessors, and Asser bestows similar praise on the great Alfred. With how much efi'ect the Celtic bards pursued the practice of inflaming their hearers with a spirit of freedom is universally' acknowledged. So influential were they, that national enterprises were directed and controlled by them; and the Roman policy so cruelly carried into effect by Suetonius in Anglesea, was imitated by-Edward the First in his sanguinairy wars with the Cumri. Even Queen Elizabeth thought it necessary to enact some laws to restrain and discourage the bards both of Ireland and VVales. The Bardic compositions, commemorating the worth and exploits of heroes who had successively figured in the different states, were a sort of national annals which served the double purpose of preserving the memory of past transactions, and of stimulating the youth to an imitation of their virtuous ancestors. The lives of the upright Celtic statesmen and heroes were handed down to posterity, and exhibited as illustrious examples for the youth to follow. Their virtues were detailed in verse so' forcible, and national calamities were pourtrayed in language so affecting, that the 214...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 130 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 245g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236907892
  • 9781236907899