Science, Vol. 22

Science, Vol. 22 : A Weekly Journal Devoted to the Advancement of Science, Publishing the Official Notices and Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; July-December, 1905 (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from Science, Vol. 22: A Weekly Journal Devoted to the Advancement of Science, Publishing the Official Notices and Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; July-December, 1905 Even in pathological conditions a re markable constancy of total heat produc tion is apparent. Thus in such typical, disturbances as anaemia, diabetes, gout and obesity, the general laws governing the output of carbon dioxide, the absorption of oxygen and the production of heat are found to be the same as in health. In fever the metabolism and heat production increase and this to a certain extent on account Of the warming of the cells. In exophthalmic goiter. There is probably an increase in metabolism, due to the chemical stimulus of an excessive production of iodothyrin in the thyroid gland, while in myxoedema the absence of the same sub stance causes a considerable reduction in the metabolism. Drugs may influence the course of the metabolism, iodothyrin creasing it and morphine profoundly di minishing it, but on the whole the most striking fact is not the variability, but rather the uniformity, of the processes con cerned. Within recent years the work of Kossel, Fischer, Hofmeister and Levene has given a more definite conception of the composi tion of proteid than was before possible. There is every indication that the proteid molecule consists fundamentally of groups of amino fatty acids banded together. Proteids vary with the integral components of their chemical chains. It has long been known that the end products of tryptic digestion include such substances, but Kutscher first showed that continued tryp tic digestion resulted in the complete trans formation of proteid into these amino-acids. Cohnheim discovered erepsin, an enzyme derived from the intestinal wall, which rapidly converts albumoses into these sub stances. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 902 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 45mm | 1,179g
  • Forgotten Books
  • United States
  • English
  • , black & white illustrations
  • 0243110707
  • 9780243110704