Science and Mechanism; Including Extended Descriptions of the Most Important Contributions in the Various Departments, with Annotations and Notes Relative to the Progress and Present State of Applied Science, and the Useful Arts. Edited

Science and Mechanism; Including Extended Descriptions of the Most Important Contributions in the Various Departments, with Annotations and Notes Relative to the Progress and Present State of Applied Science, and the Useful Arts. Edited

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ...does not affect equally all parts of the wood, the tints are in waves and veins, which are very beautiful when the wood is polished. According to Mr. Hyctt, different solutions penetrate with different degrees of facility; in applying, for instance, acetate of copper and prussiate of potash to larch, the sap-wood is colored most when the acetate is introduced first; but when the prussiate is first introduced, the heart-wood is the most deeply colored. Pyrolignite of iron causes a dark-gray color in beech, from the action of tannin in the wood on the oxyd of iron; while, in larch, it merely darkens the natural color. Most of the tints, especially those caused by the prussiates of iron and copper, arc improved by the exposure to light, and the richest colors are produced when the process is carried on rapidly. Vegetable coloring matters do not penetrate easily by the aspirative process, probably on account of the affinity of the woody fiber for the coloring matter, whereby the whole of the latter is taken up by the parts of the wood with which it first comes into contact Different intermediate shades, in a great variety, may be obtained by combinations of coloring matters, according to the tint desired and the different ideas of the dyer. When it is desired to give to wood recently worked the appearance of that which has become dark from age, ns is often the case in repairing antique furniture, it is gen ernlly effected by washing it with lime-water, or by putting on the lime as water-color, and allowing it to remain a few minutes, hours, or days, according to circumstances. Further details are.incompatible with the object of this article. That wood is a material well adapted for decorative art is abundantly proved by the fine carvings and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 332 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 18mm | 594g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236573544
  • 9781236573544