Science and Industry Volume 8

Science and Industry Volume 8

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...gives.1086 X.03 =.0032, which is to be subtracted from.0929, leaving.0897. This latter quantity is to be multiplied by 13,750, divided by the equivalent mean effective pressure, and by the percentage of the stroke completed at the point where the water rate is to be computed, which gives.0897 X X.53:1 21.54 pounds per indicated horsepower per hour. Fl REPROOF WOOD NDER a French process, wood, U treated to a bath of magnesium sulphate, is said to become fireproof. Lead electrodes are used, the one being separated from the other by a sail-cloth diaphragm. A direct current of 110 volts is passed through the wood, which extracts the sap and replaces it by non-inflammable salt. It is said that the process has been successfully applied to the manufacture of paving blocks. The rate of energy is about half an electric horsepower at 20 to 30 volts per cubic meter.--Exchange. FRICTION always appears as a resistance to motion, and on that account is of the utmost utility in many cases. Without it an arch would not stand, a rail would be useless, and a railway train could not leave the station. The transmission of power by belting would be impossible were it not for the friction of the belt upon the pulley, and a host of other mechancial devices depending upon friction for their operation would be useless. On the other hand, when motion is to be maintained between two surfaces, friction becomes a serious disadvantage and every effort is made to overcome it. Whenever two surfaces are in contact a stress exists between them, and the upper surface presses upon the lower with a force that is proportional to the weight of the upper body. At the same time the lower surface resists this downward pressure. In Fig. 1, W represents in direction and magnitude...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 114 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 218g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236953797
  • 9781236953797