The Science of Crime Scenes
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The Science of Crime Scenes

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Description

The Science of Crime Scenes addresses the science of crime scene investigation and processing, including the latest methods and technologies. This book covers the philosophy of crime scenes as historical events, the personnel involved at a scene (including the media), the detection of criminal traces and their reconstruction, and special crime scenes, such as mass disasters and terrorist events. Written by an international trio of authors with decades of crime scene experience, it is the next generation of crime scene textbooks.

The book provides in-depth coverage of disasters and mass murder, terror crime scenes, and CBRN (chemical, biological, radioactive and nuclear) - topics not covered in any other text. It includes an instructor website with lecture slides, test bank, outlines, definitions, and activities, along with a student companion site with an image collection.

This text will be of interest to advanced undergraduate and graduate students in forensic science programs, as well as to forensic practitioners and crime scene technicians.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 400 pages
  • 190.5 x 246.38 x 22.86mm | 1,247.37g
  • Academic Press Inc
  • San Diego, United States
  • English
  • Approx. 100 illustrations (50 in full color); Illustrations, unspecified
  • 012386464X
  • 9780123864642
  • 2,120,011

Table of contents

SECTION 1: THE SCIENCE OF CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION 1.0 The "forensic mindset" 1.1 From scene to laboratory to court 2.0 What is a crime scene? 2.1 Crime scene intelligence: Connecting people, places, and things

SECTION 2: PERSONNEL AND PROCEDURES 3.0 Personnel 3.1 First responder on the scene 3.2 The investigator in charge 3.3 The forensic team: Officers, scientists and specialists 3.4 Non-forensic personnel: Superiors, officials, and the media 4.0 General crime scene procedure 4.1 "Freezing" the scene and the 3R's (Recognize, Record and Recover) 4.2 The chain of custody 4.3 Recording the scene: Sketching, photography, and video

SECTION 3: DETECTION AND RECONSTRUCTION 5.0 Searching for evidence: Recovery 5.1 Detecting 5.2 Collection 5.3 Preserving 5.4 Submitting evidence to the laboratory 6.0 Evidence types and enhancement 6.1 Chemical evidence 6.2 Biological evidence 6.3 Impression evidence 6.4 Other evidence types 7.0 Crime scene reconstruction 7.1 An archaeological approach 7.2 Bloodstain pattern analysis 7.3 Photogrammetry and 3D reconstruction

SECTION 4: SPECIAL CRIME SCENES 8.0 Special crime scenes 8.1 Disaster and mass fatalities 8.2 Terrorist crime scenes 8.3 CBRN crime scenes 8.4 Underwater and underground crime scenes
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Review Text

"The Science of Crime Scenes is a good reference for the crime scene investigator. It incorporates excellent tables, charts, and illustrations which can be a great aid when processing a scene.It does a good job in describing the total spectrum of factors which can impact crime scenes and provides the reader with the necessary knowledge and tools to successfully evaluate and process the scene of a crime." -- Journal of Forensic Sciences, July 2013"The text provides in-depth detail of the science behind the scene and demonstrates the latest methods and technologies - as well as the philosophy and history behind crime scene work." -- Evidence Technology Magazine, July-August 2013".The Science of Crime Scenes is a good reference for the crime scene investigator. It incorporates excellent tables, charts, and illustrations which can be a great aid when processing a scene." --Journal of Forensic Sciences, 2013".The Science of Crime Scenes fits well within the framework of crime scene training and documents the nuances of the challenging tasks required of these specialized personnel. This reviewer's recommendation is that forensic laboratories add The Science of Crime Scenes to their training literature, and allow analysts to garner invaluable insight from the highly experienced trio of authors." --Crime Scene, Volume 39, Issue 2, Spring 2013"A half century has not dimmed skeptics' suspicions about the death of Marilyn Monroe at age 36, but the intervening decades have seen technological leaps that could alter the investigation were it to occur today. 'The good news is we're very advanced from 50 years ago,' said Max Houck, a forensic consultant and co-author of 'The Science of Crime Scenes.' 'The bad news is, we're still trying to put it in context,' he said." -- Associated Press article on the 50 th anniversary of Marilyn Monroe's death carried on multiple publications and sites incuding CBSNews.com "The Science of Crime Scenes is a good reference for the crime scene investigator. It incorporates excellent tables, charts, and illustrations which can be a great aid when processing a scene.It does a good job in describing the total spectrum of factors which can impact crime scenes and provides the reader with the necessary knowledge and tools to successfully evaluate and process the scene of a crime." -- Journal of Forensic Sciences, July 2013"The text provides in-depth detail of the science behind the scene and demonstrates the latest methods and technologies - as well as the philosophy and history behind crime scene work." -- Evidence Technology Magazine, July-August 2013".The Science of Crime Scenes is a good reference for the crime scene investigator. It incorporates excellent tables, charts, and illustrations which can be a great aid when processing a scene." --Journal of Forensic Sciences, 2013".The Science of Crime Scenes fits well within the framework of crime scene training and documents the nuances of the challenging tasks required of these specialized personnel. This reviewer's recommendation is that forensic laboratories add The Science of Crime Scenes to their training literature, and allow analysts to garner invaluable insight from the highly experienced trio of authors." --Crime Scene, Volume 39, Issue 2, Spring 2013"A half century has not dimmed skeptics' suspicions about the death of Marilyn Monroe at age 36, but the intervening decades have seen technological leaps that could alter the investigation were it to occur today. 'The good news is we're very advanced from 50 years ago,' said Max Houck, a forensic consultant and co-author of 'The Science of Crime Scenes.' 'The bad news is, we're still trying to put it in context,' he said." -- Associated Press article on the 50 th anniversary of Marilyn Monroe's death carried on multiple publications and sites incuding CBSNews.com
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Review quote

"The Science of Crime Scenes is a good reference for the crime scene investigator. It incorporates excellent tables, charts, and illustrations which can be a great aid when processing a scene...It does a good job in describing the total spectrum of factors which can impact crime scenes and provides the reader with the necessary knowledge and tools to successfully evaluate and process the scene of a crime." --Journal of Forensic Sciences, July 2013

"The text provides in-depth detail of the science behind the scene and demonstrates the latest methods and technologies - as well as the philosophy and history behind crime scene work." --Evidence Technology Magazine, July-August 2013

"...The Science of Crime Scenes is a good reference for the crime scene investigator. It incorporates excellent tables, charts, and illustrations which can be a great aid when processing a scene." --Journal of Forensic Sciences, 2013

"...The Science of Crime Scenes fits well within the framework of crime scene training and documents the nuances of the challenging tasks required of these specialized personnel. This reviewer's recommendation is that forensic laboratories add The Science of Crime Scenes to their training literature, and allow analysts to garner invaluable insight from the highly experienced trio of authors." --Crime Scene, Volume 39, Issue 2, Spring 2013

"A half century has not dimmed skeptics' suspicions about the death of Marilyn Monroe at age 36, but the intervening decades have seen technological leaps that could alter the investigation were it to occur today... `The good news is we're very advanced from 50 years ago,' said Max Houck, a forensic consultant and co-author of `The Science of Crime Scenes.' `The bad news is, we're still trying to put it in context,' he said." --Associated Press article on the 50th anniversary of Marilyn Monroe's death carried on multiple publications and sites incuding CBSNews.com
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About Frank CRISPINO

Dr. Max M. Houck is an international forensic expert with over 25 years of experience. Houck has experience in the private sector, academia, local government, and worked at the Federal Bureau of Investigation Laboratory Division. He has worked as a forensic anthropologist, a trace evidence analyst, a researcher, and has managed millions of dollars in grants and awards. Most recently, he was the inaugural Director of the Department of Forensic Sciences in Washington, D.C., overseeing 150 employees and managing the forensic science laboratory, the public health laboratory, and crime scene sciences for the nation's capital. Houck has worked on a number of mass casualty scenes, including the Branch Davidian Investigation and the September 11, 2001 attack on the Pentagon. Widely published, Houck has dozens of peer-reviewed journal articles and is the author and editor of numerous books. He is co-author of the best-selling Fundamentals of Forensic Science, Science of Crime Scenes, and Success with Expert Testimony, among others. He is the editor of the Advanced Forensic Science series of books. Houck is also founding co-editor of Forensic Science Policy and Management (the official journal of ASCLD), the only journal that addresses the management, policy, and administration of forensic science. Houck has served on numerous committees, including for the National Academies of Science, NIST, Interpol, The Royal Society, the Director of the FBI, and the White House. He is a popular public speaker and has given presentations at NASA, the Max Planck Institute, an Oxford Roundtable, as well as keynote talks at numerous international conferences. Houck has taught at several universities, including West Virginia University and University of Tampa. His research topics include management, leadership, and policy implications for forensic organizations. Houck has a Bachelors and Masters degree in anthropology from Michigan State University. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Chemistry Summa Cum Laude from Curtin University in Perth, Australia. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. Dr Frank Crispino served for 25 years in the French Gendarmerie, one of the two State Police forces of France under military status. He retired with the rank of Colonel in 2012. A graduate from the French Air Force and Gendarmerie Academies, he joined l'Institut de recherche criminelle de la gendarmerie nationale (IRCGN), the Gendarmerie Forensic Institute, in 1993 to create the forensic anthropology department, as the core of the French Disaster Victim Identification Unit. Dr. Crispino is a graduate from the French War College (2003-2004), has a Ph.D. in forensic science from Lausanne University, School of Criminal Sciences (2006). He commanded two Criminal Investigation Departments at regional levels (serious/organized crimes and terrorism) in central and southwestern France (Bourges from 2002 to 2003 and Bordeaux from 2007 to 2011) and served as Deputy Head of the Antiterrorist Bureau at the General Headquarters of the French Gendarmerie in Paris (2003-2007), where he joined the G8 counter-terrorist group and other relevant EU bodies. He concluded his military career as representative of the Division General in charge of the Forensic and Intelligence Hub of the French Gendarmerie (2011-2012) to launch a new forensic academic curriculum in the Bachelor in Chemistry at l'Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres (UQTR). Professor Crispino is author or co-author of two books, 8 book chapters, more than 40 peer-reviewed articles. He is the director of the Laboratoire de recherche en criminalistique (www.uqtr.ca/LRC) - Forensic Research Group - at the UQTR, regular researcher at the International Centre for Comparative Criminology (http://www.cicc.umontreal.ca/en). Terry McAdam is the Director of the Washington State Patrol Seattle Crime Laboratory. He has been a practicing forensic scientist for 39 years. He began his career with the State Crime Laboratory in Northern Ireland where he worked for 10 years in the testing of blood alcohols, breath alcohol, toxicology, fire debris, explosives, and trace evidence,. In the United States he has worked in many other disciplines in forensic science including, drug analysis, bloodstain pattern interpretation, and crime scene reconstruction. He has attended over 300 crimes scenes, and was a major participant in the crime scenes and the trace evidence analysis associated with the Green River homicides. He has assessed many crime laboratories throughout the world and in 2014 he was the recipient from the American Society of Crime Lab Directors, of the inaugural Longhetti/Keaton Assessor Excellence Award.
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