School Funds and Their Apportionment; A Consideration of the Subject with Reference to a More General Equalization of Both the Burdens and the Advantages of Education

School Funds and Their Apportionment; A Consideration of the Subject with Reference to a More General Equalization of Both the Burdens and the Advantages of Education

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...sight appear. So long as a school had the same percentage of the census enrolled as the state average it would make no difference at all, because the change from the larger number of census children to the smaller number of children enrolled would decrease the size of the divisor and proportionately increase the size of the quotient in determining the per-capita amount to be apportioned by the state. If the country schools could rise above the state average, as Table No. 38 seems to indicate that they, in general, do, then the country schools would gain instead of lose in a change from a census to an enrollment basis. This may be illustrated quite well by the case of Wisconsin. Dividing the total amount of money apportioned for 1903-04 by the number of census children gives $1.82j4 per census child, the From Table No. 34, Chapter IX. amount of the per-capita on census apportionment for that year, as stated in Table No. 24, Chapter IX. But dividing the same sum by the total school enrollment for the same period gives $2.99 per-capita for an apportionment based on total enrollment. A requirement of forty days of enrollment before being allowed to count for the state apportionment would further increase the per-capita apportionment on enrollment. In Minnesota, where statistics for a forty-day enrollment exist, about fifteen per cent. of the total state enrollment has for some years failed to remain in school forty days.5 Assuming that Wisconsin required a forty day enrollment and that the same percentage failed to remain in school for forty days as in the case of Minnesota, the per-capita apportionment, on a forty day enrollment, would become $3.52 in consequence. There being only so much money to go around, the smaller the number on which it is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236554833
  • 9781236554833