The School Book Question; Letters in Reply to the Brown-Cambell Crusade Against the Educational Department for Upper Canada

The School Book Question; Letters in Reply to the Brown-Cambell Crusade Against the Educational Department for Upper Canada

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1866 edition. Excerpt: ...system remains the same; and that the whole tendency of our school legislation in late years, and of the suggestions which are being discussed for its improvement, all point towards the increase of this principle of uniformity. Any illustrations therefore drawn, as illustrations have been attempted to be drawn fey the advocates of the so-called system of "free trade in books," from England, where an entirely different system of public education prevails, are utterly inapplicable. One would imagine that there could really be no two opinions on the subject of the importance of uniformity in the school books. A contrary course involves one of two evils: either the teacher on every change must find himself subjected to the annoyance and impediment of teaching from a new and different set of text books from those which he has been in the habit of using; or else the parents of the pupils must be put to the expense of procuring new text books for them similar to those which the teacher has been wont to use and happens to prefer, and, which is a still greater evil, the pupils are necessarily retarded in their studies by the difficulty of mastering the new books. That is the system which is gravely advocated. We believe the public at large will not hesitate to believe that no man in his sober senses, unless he had some personal object to serve, --some little private axe to grind--would venture to insult the public intelligence by advocating it. We are glad to notice that even the Globe is compelled to concede this point, so utterly monstrous is the opposite doctrine. "If one "could possibly imagine a system of manage"ment," says that paper, "by which a uniform "set of books could be secured, thoroughly "up to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 136g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236521730
  • 9781236521736