Savage Africa; Being the Narrative of a Tour in Equatorial, South-Western, and North-Western Africa with Notes on the Habits of the Gorilla on the Existence of Unicorns and Tailed Men on the Slave Trade on the Origin, Character, Volume 1

Savage Africa; Being the Narrative of a Tour in Equatorial, South-Western, and North-Western Africa with Notes on the Habits of the Gorilla on the Existence of Unicorns and Tailed Men on the Slave Trade on the Origin, Character, Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 edition. Excerpt: ... in his bamboo piazza, in company with another small trader. He had a good-natured mouth, a sweet voice, and sly, small eyes. He welcomed me with a grand show of cordiality, and, following the custom of his tribe (which is that also of the Spaniards and Portuguese), requested me to look upon his house and furniture as my own personal property, and upon himself as my devoted slave. The other man's name was Tibbett. He was an American negro, who had returned to his mother-land, and had gracefully conformed to her customs by abandoning Christianity and marrying fifteen wives. He had the charge of a French factory up the Boque, and, having spent several years among our neighbours, his face had acquired that low type which abounds in the refuse of Gallic seaports. John proved himself at his own table to be almost a gentleman, though he fell into the somewhat common error of apologising for the meagreness of a better dinner, than he usually served, and perhaps took a little too much trouble to impress upon me that if I had dined with him in his house at Glass Town he would have given me champagne. "Hospitality," writes some pompous fool, "among civilized nations loses its purity from the ostentation which enters into all its actions." Now the hospitality of the African savage is precisely that of an English hotel--viz., accommodation for the night, which you pay for in the morning. The hospitality of the halfcivilized negro is bestowed with the ne plus ultra of middle-class vulgarity. But Ragenji, I repeat, was a subdued specimen of the class, and did not remind me very often that I was eating a dinner which he had paid for. After the dinner was cleared away we drank bottled ale till John became quite " laughful," as he...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236499476
  • 9781236499479