The Saturday Evening Post Volume 184, No. 8

The Saturday Evening Post Volume 184, No. 8

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...cents a ton. Naturally Norfolk wants free tolls for coastal ships. Norfolk also wants a United States merchant marine to carry her growing commerce. Of two hundred million bushels of wheat which one railroad carried to Norfolk in ten years, only half a million bushels went to Liverpool on American ships. How does Norfolk think that a marine should be built up? Not a soul at Newport News or Norfolk advocated subsidies. Several plans were suggestedone by Mr. Dickson, of the Board of Trade, also head of the big lumber exporters of the South--to give free tolls not only to American coastal vessels, but also to American cargoes, whether in American or foreign vessels. This would entail admitting foreign ships to the United States coast trade--but it would mean low rates for the shipper; and the lumber dealers of the South must have those low rates or see prices soar beyond the average buyer's means. "It will surprise most people to be told that the South must soon import lumber," said Mr. Dickson; "but we are within a few years of that now. To send lumber to England, thirty-five hundred miles, costs us from twelve to fifteen cents a hundredweight, including handling at both ends. For us to bring lumber here from the Pacific Coast costs us eighty-five cents. There is the difference between ocean and rail rates on lumber. By way of Panama we could bring that Pacific Coast lumber here for twenty cents and we could ship it back inland toward the Mississippi centers for sixteen cents more. Now look at the difference. The interior thinks it is not concerned in Panama. On lumber, brought round by Panama and shipped back inland, we can save the buyer more than fifty per cent of what he is now paying in freight." Tariff Favors for...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 578 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 30mm | 1,021g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236752503
  • 9781236752505