Sampson's Discourse, and Correspondence with Various Learned Jurists, Upon the History of the Law; With the Addition of Several Essays, Tracts, and Documents, Relating to the Subject

Sampson's Discourse, and Correspondence with Various Learned Jurists, Upon the History of the Law; With the Addition of Several Essays, Tracts, and Documents, Relating to the Subject

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1826 edition. Excerpt: ...I would not recommend, as long as a hope can be entertained of effecting the object by less violent means. 1 have brought this subject to the view of my native State more than once, but nothing decisive has been done. At the last session of the legislature, the judiciary committee of the House bi Representatives reported that it was inexpedient to write the common law. Why inexpedient, this enlightened committee did not deign to say. The able pen of President Cooper, on this subject, I trust, may yet do much good. Wishing you success in your endeavors, I am, with considerations of great respect, yours, &c. JOHN L. WILSON. To John L. Wiison, Esq. late Governor of the State of South Carolina. Sir: I have read, with much satisfaction, your letter, addressed to me, in the New York National Advocate of this morning. I am glad that you follow the example of President Cooper, in giving publicity to your sentiments. If discussions of important topics be of any use, their utility is greatly increased by the extensive and rapid circulation of a daily paper. It was so that the wise and virtuous Franklin thought, and his communications through that channel, were of more use to his country than the most ostentatious volumes; and, I think, concealing his name is but false modesty in a writer, whose aim is to do good. For though a name be no authority, it is still a pledge of loyalty and confidence. It shows that there is no hidden motive of intrigue; no mystery or disguise; no fear of personal attack, which the shield of an honest character cannot repel: and I shall therefore continue, though at a distance, to imitate those who have so done. You say, and I trust your prediction will be fulfilled, that New York is destined to be a great precursor in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236658167
  • 9781236658166