Salamis. Actium. Lepanto. Gravelines. the Revenga Dungeness. La Hougue. Bon Homme Richard and Serapia. the Nile. Foudroyant and Guillaume Tel

Salamis. Actium. Lepanto. Gravelines. the Revenga Dungeness. La Hougue. Bon Homme Richard and Serapia. the Nile. Foudroyant and Guillaume Tel

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ...harder fought fights than she had ever yet experienced.1 It was not until nearly two centuries thereafter that a nation of her own blood successfully held her proud arm lest it fall in high-handed arrogance, for the simple assertion of its rights as a sovereign people. It was reserved for Captain Hull in the Constitution, in 1812, to open the eyes of Great Britain to the fact that a new sea-power was in existence to challenge her sovereignty, a new national symbol to float as proudly at the masthead as her own. There were minor causes of disaffection between the two countries. When the Spaniards had been conquered, as they were most thoroughly in 1639 by the Dutch, the treaty made with Spain excluded English manufactures, giving a monopoly to the conquerors. This the English merchants could not brook. 1 This claim of sovereignty is of early date. Witness the pride of the sovereign Edgar, who was crowned king of all England A.D. 800: " Ego Edgarns Anglorum Basileus, omninm que rerum, insularum Oceani, quae Brittaniam circumgarent, cunctarumque nationnm, quae infra eam includuntur, lmperator et Domiuus."--Navul Chronicle. Vol. IV., Lond. 1801. The Dutch were offended at the execution of Charles I. They had no special sympathy with Parliament. Under the Commonwealth the advantage of the alliance between Prince William, the Stadtholder's son, and Princess Mary, the eldest daughter of Charles, was rendered of less account. In their indignation the Dutch insulted the English ambassador at the Hague by shouting behind his carriage, " King's murderer." The Roundheads and Cavaliers were in the midst of their conflicts. Prince Rupert, the Pretender, had gathered a fleet and was permitted to take residence at the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 100 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236935381
  • 9781236935380