Sadako

Sadako

By (author)  , Illustrated by 

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Description

Hospitalized with the dreaded atom bomb disease, leukemia, Sadako races against time to fold one thousand paper cranes. Legend says this will make a sick person healthy.show more

Product details

  • 6-8
  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 198.12 x 248.92 x 5.08mm | 158.76g
  • Paperstar Book
  • New York, NY, United States
  • English
  • Reprint
  • 0698115880
  • 9780698115880
  • 78,520

About Eleanor Coerr

Eleanor Coerr was born in Kamsack, Saskatchewan, Canada, and grew up in Saskatoon. Two of her favorite childhood hobbies were reading and making up stories. Her powerful novel, Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes, has been translated into many languages and has moved both children and adults to write plays, perform ballets, compose songs, and collect money for peace statues—all celebrating Sadako and her wish for peace. Eleanor has visited schools all around the world encouraging her audiences to work for a nonviolent world. Folded cranes are everywhere, and always underneath the statue of Sadako in Hiroshima's Peace Park. Caldecott medalist Ed Young (edyoungart.com) was born in Tientsin, China, and brought up in Shanghai. He cites the philosophy of Chinese painting as an inspiration for much of his work. Mr. Young has been illustrating children's books for more than twenty years and has won many awards. He received the 1990 Caldecott Medal for his book Lon Po Po, and his much-lauded collaboration with anthologist Nancy Larrick, Cats Are Cats, was named one of the Ten Best Illustrated Books of 1988 by The New York Times. Mr. Young studied at the University of Illinois, the Art Center of Los Angeles, and Pratt Institute in New York City. He and his family live in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.show more

Review quote

Praise for Sadako "A masterful collaboration that will attract many new friends for Sadako."—School Library Journal "Coerr's condensed text succeeds in retaining the simple lyricism of the original, allowing the leukemia-stricken Sadako to emerge as a quietly courageous girl."—Publishers Weeklyshow more