The Ruthven of Freeland Peerage and Its Critics

The Ruthven of Freeland Peerage and Its Critics

By (author) 

List price: US$15.84

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...seen, postpone Ruthven to two peerages which were created on days of that month later than the 3rd; and the 1G. E. C. in his turn (Complete Peerage, vi. p. 458, note 5; and pp. 461-2, note f), founds upon Macfarlan's MS. on the authority of Mr. Round. evidence, also already mentioned, that the patentee nearly three months later----on 30th March--was still sitting and acting in Parliament as a commoner. The credit, therefore, which Macfarlan's List lacks in the general it does not command in the particular--it proves nothing, by itself it is worthless, and as a mere corroboration of any evidence it coincides with, it is of exceedingly little or of no value. Let it be noted, however, for what it may turn out to be worth, that Macfarlan states the limitation of the patent of Ruthven to have been to heirs male, thus admitting collaterals. He thus flatly contradicts Mr. Round's and also Riddell's only other positive authority, Crawford, whose story is that the limitation was to heir: male of the body only. Either Macfarlan's or Crawford's version would be enough for Mr. Round's purpose to exclude the heir female or the heir of entail; but as both versions cannot be true the one cannot corroborate the other, and Mr. Round must elect which he will stand by, unless he abandons both. For the present his Case is as an house divided against itself. The first three authorities--first at least in chronological order--which were set up as sounder and solider evidence than the Rolls of 1707 and 1740, have crumbled at the touch. The fourth and last authority is a statement by Lord Hailes. The observations attributed to that great antiquary which are here quoted relate to the summonses, which he and Douglas...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123686834X
  • 9781236868343