Russian Expansion on the Pacific, 1641-1850; An Account of the Earliest and Later Expeditions Made by the Russians Along the Pacific Coast of Asia and North America Including Some Related Expeditions to the Arctic Regions Volume 3

Russian Expansion on the Pacific, 1641-1850; An Account of the Earliest and Later Expeditions Made by the Russians Along the Pacific Coast of Asia and North America Including Some Related Expeditions to the Arctic Regions Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...as far as the neighborhood of the fifty-sixth parallel. On midnight of November 4, the wind being westerly, the course was changed to southerly. So certain were those on board that Kamchatka was close at hand that on the morning of November 5 sails were taken in so as not to run into it. When about nine o'clock land showed itself there was great rejoicing, the sick crawled out of their berths to have a look. A number of landmarks were identified as those of Kamchatka and the boat sailed up and down to get a closer view of them and by doing so it came into a bay. Fortunately for them the sun came out at noon allowing an observation, and to their great disappointment their position was found to be between the fifty-fifth and fifty-sixth parallels, too far north for Avatcha. The next move was to get out of the bay and away from land because of the threatening storm. The condition of the men on the boat was most pitiful. There were only ten persons who were able to get about at all." During the last few days many on board died, the sick were sinking fast, and those who stood their watch were so weak that they had to be led to their places and taken from them by men who were not in much better physical condition themselves.115 The days were gloomy and short and the nights long and black, with the danger of running into some unknown land at any time. So helpless were they that when the storm broke on them about midnight there was no one able to furl the sails, the result being that they were torn, the masts sprung and became in part useless. This was the situation on the morning of the sixth. A council of the ship's officers was called to decide on the next step. After taking into consideration the condition of men and boat, time of year, distance from...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236661788
  • 9781236661784