The Ruskin Birthday Book; A Selection of Thoughts, Mottoes, and Aphorisms, for Every Day in the Year, from the Works of John Ruskin

The Ruskin Birthday Book; A Selection of Thoughts, Mottoes, and Aphorisms, for Every Day in the Year, from the Works of John Ruskin

By (author) 

List price: US$15.83

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ...that is great is easy.--The Two Paths. JEE that you can obey good laws, and good lords, or law-wards, if you once get them--that you believe in goodness enough to know what a good law is. A good law is one that holds, whether you recognize and pronounce it or not; a bad law is one that cannot hold, however much you ordain and pronounce it.--Fors Clavigera, Letter x. T is only by labour that thought can be made healthy, and only by thought that labour can be made happy--and the two cannot be separated with impunity.--The Stones of Venice. When men are rightly occupied, their amusement grows out of their work, as the colour petals out of a fruitful flower;--when they are faithfully helpful and compassionate, their emotions become steady, deep, perpetual, and vivifying to the soul, as the natural pulse to the body.--Sesame and Lilies. 6. HILE precious materials may with a certain profusion and negligence be employed for the magnificence of what is seldom seen, the work of man cannot be idly and carelessly bestowed without an immediate sense of wrong; as if the strength of the living creature were never intended by its Maker to be sacrificed in vain, though it is well for us sometimes to part with what we esteem precious of substance, as showing that in such service it becomes but dross and dust.--The Sfi'en Lamps of Architecture. HE first character of a good and wise man at his work is to know that he knows very little;--to perceive that there are many above him wiser than he, and to be always asking' questions, wanting to learn, not to teach. No one ever teaches well, who wants to teach, or governs well who wants to govern.--The Crown of Wild Olive. Knowledge is infinite, and the man most learned in human estimation is just as far from...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236896521
  • 9781236896520