Rural Residences; Consisting of a Series of Designs for Cottages, Decorated Cottages, Small Villas and Other Ornamental Buildings...

Rural Residences; Consisting of a Series of Designs for Cottages, Decorated Cottages, Small Villas and Other Ornamental Buildings...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1832 edition. Excerpt: ...into a considerable mass of the fluid; for by so doing, we may discover any degree of muddiness much better than can be done if the water be viewed through the glass horizontally, or held between the eye and the place whence the direct light proceeds. It should also be perfectly colourless, devoid of odour, and its taste lively and agreeable. It should send out air-bubbles when poured from one vessel into another; 5------.---.---"------$1_, corrxerz onus. 55 it should boil pulse soft, and form with soap an uniform opaline fluid. The liability of water to spoil by long keeping in close vessels, is by no means a criterion of its disqualification for the ordinary purposes of life, as is often imagined; it merely proves the presence of organic matter. To acquire a knowledge of the general nature of water does not require much address; it is only necessary to add to the water we wish to examine certain chemical re-agents, or tests, and, from the phenomena which they produce, a sufficient notion may be formed of the general constitution of the water. Thus, if tincture or solution of soap in spirits of wine, dropped into water, produces immediately a white curdy precipitate, the water abounds in earthy salts, which are chiefly sulphate and super-carbonate of lime, and sometimes magnesian salts. Such waters are unfit for boiling peas, and all kinds of leguminous seeds, at least if they contain more than four grains of solid matter of these salts in a pint of water. They have usually a cool brisk taste, which renders them more palatable, and therefore are preferred by water-drinkers. Hard waters may, in general, be cured by dropping into them a solution of sub-carbonate of potash; or, if the hardness be owing to the presence of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236825055
  • 9781236825056