The Rural Economy of the Midland Counties; Including the Management of Livestock in Leicestershire and Its Environs Together with Minutes on Agriculture and Planting in the District of the Midland Station

The Rural Economy of the Midland Counties; Including the Management of Livestock in Leicestershire and Its Environs Together with Minutes on Agriculture and Planting in the District of the Midland Station

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1790 edition. Excerpt: ...the surface; while the hawthorn feeds, principally, in the fame pasture with the barley. It nevertheless seems reasonable, when the hawthorn blows late, to be before, rather than behind, the season of blowing. For it is observable, throughout, that the Time Of Ripening corresponds, in a P 3 great great degree, with the Time Of VegetaTing: unless when the maturation was disturbed, as it was in O by an adventitious circumstance. 91. Octoser. i. In market conversation, the Changtng Of Seed became the subject. Mr.--, the largest occupier in the district, thinks it of no use. He has not changed his red wheat, for ten or twelve years; and yet experiences no falling off. Other farmers, who have done the fame, are even celebrated for their feed wheat. I never, however, have perceived so ge-. neral a spirit for the changing of seed, as prevails in this district, Mr.-', of.-," has some wheat just arrived from Cambridge-, shire, which stands him in nine shillings a bushel, Winchester measure, and fetches it ten or twelve miles. He, on tlie other hand, fends some this year into Shropshire. Even the little field farmers have been accustomed to sow wheat of the southern counties; but, from what I can learn, the spirit begins to abate. Indeed, Indeed, the practice here, as everywhere else, seems to be sounded on general notions; and no one appears even to reason upon its propriety; much less bring any other proofs of its utility, than " it must be so." 92. October I. It is remarkable that there is not, in this quarter of the district, a good crop of barley after turneps. Mr. 's, though the first sown barley. in the country, and on one of the best pieces of land in it, is worse than that of No. 1. And Mr., who got his turneps off early, and his...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 84 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236632303
  • 9781236632302