Rosa's Summer Wanderings, by the Authoress of 'Floreat Ecclesia' (R. Raine). Repr., with Additions, from the Churchman's Companion

Rosa's Summer Wanderings, by the Authoress of 'Floreat Ecclesia' (R. Raine). Repr., with Additions, from the Churchman's Companion

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1858 edition. Excerpt: ...six feet wide, having a tremendous precipice on each of its sides; the path, however, is not so jagged as that along Swirrel Edge. Here it was that the fatal accident occurred to the unfortunate Charles Gough, who started one morning early in 1805, with the intention of crossing Helvellyn. Being an enthusiastic admirer of nature in her grandest moods, he was in the habit of wan 1 "A tarn is a lake, generally (perhaps always) a small one, lying above the level of the inhabited valleys, and the large lakes; and has this peculiarity, (first noticed by Wordsworth) that it has no main feeder. Now this latter accident of the thing at once explains the origin of the word, viz. that it is the Danish word taanen, or tjarn, --a trickling of tean, --a deposit of waters from the weeping of rain down the smooth faces of the rocks."--Thoniat de Quincey. dering at all seasons over the trackless moors and mountains of the lake district, with no other companion than his dog; and on this fatal morning he took his way across Striden Edge, attended only by this faithful animal. What was the cause of Mr. Gough's dismal adventure, could never be clearly deciphered, even by the almost Indian sagacity of the most practised mountaineers. The probability is that one of those mountain mists,1 wont so suddenly to shroud surrounding objects, cast an impenetrable veil of obscurity over the whole prospect, and concealed the track from sight. He never reached the mountain foot again; no tidings of him as a living man ever came to expectant friends; and it was not till after the expiration of twelve weeks that a shepherd, in quest of a stray sheep, being startled by the sound--unusual among those 1 "Impenetrable volumes of mountain-mist often come floating over the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 124 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 236g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236507045
  • 9781236507044