Rome in the Nineteenth Century; Containing a Complete Account of the Ruins of the Ancient City, the Remains of the Middle Ages, and the Monuments of Modern Times in a Series of Letters Written During a Residence at Rome, in the Volume 1

Rome in the Nineteenth Century; Containing a Complete Account of the Ruins of the Ancient City, the Remains of the Middle Ages, and the Monuments of Modern Times in a Series of Letters Written During a Residence at Rome, in the Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1827 edition. Excerpt: ...the foreign ambassadors awaited the deliberations of the Senate; and it doubtless derived its name from the Grecians, who, in the early ages of Rome, were the only Ambassadors sent to the State. As the Graecostasis appears on a fragment of the Ichnography, it must have been standing in the time of Septimius Severus.f The Basilica Porcia, the most ancient basilica in Rome, (built by Cato the Censor, ) adjoined the Curia Hostilia, and was burnt down with it during the tumult raised by the populace after the murder of Clodius, when they tore up the benches and tables in the Senate-house, and lighted his funeral-pile upon its floor. The Ichnography, or ancient plan of Rome, a work of the reign of S. Severus, which formed the pavement of a Temple, now the Church of S. S. Cosmo and Dumiano, was found broken into fragments on the ground, and the parts that have escaped total destruction are affixed on the wall of the staircase of the Capitol, without any attempt at arrangement--which, indeed, would be wholly impracticable. t It is recorded that Antoninus Pius rebuilt the Graecostasis, but no mention is made of his having touched the Comitium. Vet Mr. Nibby, (p. 63, Del Foro Romano, ) concludes that he united both these buildings into one; because, three hundred years after, of the two Regionaries, (Rufus and Victor, ) one mentions the' Gracostasis, and the other the Comitium--though, even then, they do not pretend they were the same buildings. The Rostra seems, from various passages of the classics, to have been near the Curia and Comitium, facing the Capitol, consequently on the south side of the Forum, and in a central situation; but its exact site certainly cannot now be ascertained. It was not, as I had imagined, a small pulpit, but an elevated...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236494709
  • 9781236494702