The Romance of Bird Life; Being an Account of the Education, Courtship, Sport and Play, Journeys, Fishing, Fighting, Piracy, Domestic and Social Habits, Instinct, Strange Friendships and Other Interesting Aspects of the Life of Birds

The Romance of Bird Life; Being an Account of the Education, Courtship, Sport and Play, Journeys, Fishing, Fighting, Piracy, Domestic and Social Habits, Instinct, Strange Friendships and Other Interesting Aspects of the Life of Birds

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ... be washing and cooling themselves with the moisture. Shower-baths, too, are much appreciated by the commoner species of Humming-birds which are seen in gardens, for they have frequently been observed flying to and fro through the spray of a fountain. Fountains, however, are not found everywhere, and few birds would be able to enjoy the luxury of a shower-bath if they had to depend on such artificial appliances. But Nature provides a shower-bath for all, in most of the regions inhabited by birds: the most perfect of all shower-baths, rain. Now there are birds which dislike rain almost as much as their hereditary enemies the cats dislike it; some, on the other hand, delight in it. I have noticed that the birds which habitually indulge in what we may call a plunge-bath, seem to find it most enjoyable of all when it is combined with a shower; and during a rain-storm, especially after a spell of fine weather, great numbers of feathered bathers take advantage of the opportunity. Amongst the raiii-loving species we find birds as widely different as Ducks and Parrots. During the progress of a heavy tropical rain-storm, when the air is almost darkened, Parrots may frequently be seen sitting motionless at the very summit of a tree, on dead branches devoid of foliage, allowing the water to stream over them, and uttering cheerful screams of enjoyment. They might easily find shelter amidst the thick boughs and dense foliage below them, but they prefer to expose themselves to the shower, though in fine weather they keep under cover. As soon as the rain has ceased, however, they appear just as eager to get dry again. Parrots very quickly become drenched with moisture, and they are absolutely incapable of swimming. I recollect one which fell overboard...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 118 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236738640
  • 9781236738646