A Roll of the Household Expenses of Richard de Swinfield, Bishop of Hereford, During Part of the Years 1289 and 1290

A Roll of the Household Expenses of Richard de Swinfield, Bishop of Hereford, During Part of the Years 1289 and 1290

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ... to allude to the defects of the late governess, and those who had been under her care, though not, probably, under her control.b Elecli Helgensis. John Kirkby or de Kyrkby, Bishop of Ely, who had been treasurer of the Exchequer, died March 16, 1289, just in time, it was thought, to escape the severe censure of the King, in the great reform of official corruption that was carried out this year. Upon his decease the monks of Ely obtained leave to elect William de Luda, Archdeacon of Durham, a man of the highest reputation, who had long been treasurer of the wardrobe.c This was the prelate who was saddled with a part of the annual expenses of the boys De la Ffite at Oxford, ralione novas creationist (See ante, p. 118.) The King appears to have had great confidence in his integrity, and had called him to his parliament on the morrow of the Holy Trinity, though he was then only elect.c Unless this were the usual custom, it was a proof how much he valued his counsel. Afterwards to him and to his own uncle, and two of his newly created judges, Edward assigned the task of holding an inquest at Abergavenny upon the great quarrel between the Earls of Gloucester and Hereford, when such outrages had been committed by the partizans of the former upon the borders of Brecon.' It was also, perhaps, a mark of royal favour, though of a very different kind, that on July 25th he made De Luda a present of the bear in the Tower of London. If it should seem strange that such a present should have been made by a king to a bishop, it may be observed that the possession of rarer monsters was coveted in ruder days, not only as curiosities astonishing and attractive from the difficulty and expense of procuring and keeping them, but as appendages of barbarous grandeur. It...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 62 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236595106
  • 9781236595102