The Rise, Progress, and Consequences of the New Opinions and Principles Lately Introduced Into France; With Observations

The Rise, Progress, and Consequences of the New Opinions and Principles Lately Introduced Into France; With Observations

By (author) 

List price: US$15.84

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1799 edition. Excerpt: ...of law, which in Great Britain has been dignified by men of the most eminent abilities, prosound wisdom, and invincible integrity. But it is necessary to remark, that the profefiion of law in France, except in the highest offices, was not were ' were never employed' in matters of state, and therefore were totally unacquainted with politics as an art 3 a circumstance that was common to them, with the cures, and many other members of the States General. Amid so great a number of reprefentatives, there were many individuals actuated by the purest principles, who made a noble and patriotic oppofition. But either their number bore so small a proportion to the elect' of Orleans that w eir voice could not be heard, or they woreim-. posed upon by false appearances and promises, or' overawed 'by the terror of assaifination, and the dread of involving their families in ruin. From the slatement which 'has now been given, it is easy to see, that if the three orders had affernbled in separate houses, the clergy and tiers-etat would be led by the jagohius; if they assembled in one house, the majority in favour of the Jacobins was decided. It was the intention of the king, that the orders should assetnble separately as they had done on former occafions; but it was the wish of the Jaeohins to-mortify and subdue the jdobility, as well as to establish their own power, that the three' orders should be blended together. As the. decifion os this matter was injudicioufly left to the States General, the wish of the Jaeobins was quickly accomplilhcd. The 'tiers-etat were al-z flHaving, ' corrupted a great part of the Assembly by bribery, and overawed the rest by the influence of the galleries, the Jacobins found it which it wasthe object of the Jacobins to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236963768
  • 9781236963765