JJP Supplement 20 (2014) Journal of Juristic Papyrology
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JJP Supplement 20 (2014) Journal of Juristic Papyrology : The Rise of Nobadia Social Changes in Northern Nubia in Late Antiquity

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Description

The author of this book presents an innovative approach to the history of Nubia. The period covered includes the fall of Meroe and the rise of the united kingdom of Nobadia and Makuria. The emphasis was put on the analysis of social and political change/dynamics/transformations. Moreover some major improvements of the chronological nomenclature have been suggested. To date, it has been largely influenced by the early 20th cent. politically incorrect approach to African cultures and the contemporary state of research. The author implies that there is actually no reason which would compel modern scholars to study and describe the history of Nubia in other ways than the rest of the world. It means that all studies postdating this path-breaking book should be based on actual political changes and not vague racial or religious criteria. Nowadays we can be certain that after the fall of Meroe there was no political vacuum, but various political organisms immediately started to rise: Nobadia, Makuria and Alwa. For this reason the term 'Group X' should not be used any longer.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 240 pages
  • 172 x 228 x 22mm | 739.99g
  • The Journal of Juristic Papyrology
  • Warsaw, Poland
  • English
  • 8392591992
  • 9788392591993

Review quote

...Obluski's broader claim about the essential continuity of Nubian late antiquity is convincing. It is in keeping with more general trends in Nubian studies, which have in the last generation seen Nubian studies less as an ongoing cycle of external influence and disruption and more as the continuous history of a single population. Obluski's work on late antique Nubia is a welcome addition to this corpus. -- Bryn Mawr Classical Review Bryn Mawr Classical Reviewshow more