Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 2

Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 2

By (author) 

List price: US$20.21

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ... discern the strong religious tendency which would at once arise from the existence of such a disposition of mind, and we may perceive with equal clearness the absence of scientific knowledge from a system of thought thus originated. In these facfs may be readily discovered the bottom principles of what has been called, in the philosophical and reNotion of spir-ligious discussions of the present centuiT, Semitic itic. monotheism. More prop erly, however, we should say that the fact indicated is the theory of immaterial causation, without respect to its singleness or multiplicity. If we examine the Semitic nations, at our first acquaintance with them, in Chaldaea and Assyria, we shall find that they were polytheistic in their religious development--not polytheistic in the same sense with the GraecoItalic peoples of Europe, but in the same sense with the Hamitic Egyptians. It was the peculiarity of both the Hamitic and Semitic races that they ascribed to the phenomena of the material world immaterial intelligent causes. This view of the universe and its administration is totally different from polytheism as it was developed by the Aryan nations. In course of time the Aryan also arrived at the concept of immaterial and intelligent CaU-This notion difsation. But in the earlier ages of these peoples they ism. looked simply at phenomena and gave names thereto, and the names passed, according as the phenomena were vast and majestic, into the catalogue of deities. Aryan polytheism was the result of the combined tendencies of primitive natural philosophy and linguistic growth and decay. It is not intended in this place to elaborate, but only to point out the difference between the fundamental ideas of the Semitic and the Indo-European races. The former...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236490193
  • 9781236490193