Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 17

Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 17

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ...stores of some of the large industrial concerns in the United States. That may have been one of the objects of its creation, for quite naturally there was but little love among the burghers for Uitlanders of English nativity. And to make the monopoly all the more galling, the money extorted by that means was employed in arming and fortifying the Republic, with the ill-disguised purpose of getting ready for England. But, in any event, it was a purely domestic affair. The Dutchmen had the same justification for creating a dynamite monopoly for their own benefit that other nations have-for protecting their industries with high tariffs; and in this particular instance the tax was actually paid by the foreigner! Mr.Chamberlain himself-ofliciall y admitted that if made "in good faith, to benefit the state generally, and not simply to favor the concessionaires, the monopoly was consistent with the treaty," and the Dutchmen replied, with unanswerable logic, that, such being actually the case, "only the Republic itself could and would judge what was best for it." Whereupon the dynamite monopoly was allowed to drop out of the controversy. The British Government now arranged for a conference, which met at the capital of the Orange Free State on the 31st of May, 1899. But it accomplished nothing. The whole discussion turned upon the question of suffrage. England demanded the suf frage for her subjects in the Transvaal on the same conditions that she extended to the Dutch in Cape Colony, which were almost identical with those enjoyed by Englishmen themselves. Mr. Chamberlain made a great point of this proposition, and pressed it with all the forcefulness of his character. But the Transvaalers reminded him that the Cape Dutch...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 262 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 472g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236777603
  • 9781236777607