Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 13

Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 13

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...Altenstein, in Thuringia. His father, in the old home, had been a slate-cutter, but emigrated to the rich mining district of Eisleben, and became a miner. Here Martin Luther was born on the 10th of November, 1483. " I am a peasant's son," says he, in his Table-Talk; "my father, grandfather, and ancestors were all peasants." The home was humble; the parents, severe. Hans Luther, the father, was energetic, hard-working, sturdy, a strict adherent to the ancient faith. In this faith Luther was bred, in much hardship and unhappiness. The father and mother both held to the base theory and practice of punishment for children. Every trifle was treated as a crime. The eccentricities of childhood were checked with merciless rigor, and its natural joyousness suppressed. Vhipping was the rule in the Luther household. On one occasion Martin's mother beat him about a nut until his back was bloody. At school in Mansfeld he was not treated with greater lenity. Here, between the years 1494 and 1497, he remained in the hands of teachers who, according to his ovn testimony, behaved towards the pupils as if they were thieves. _ Luther relates that on a cer-T tain occasion he was himself beaten fifteen times in a single afternoon. In 1497 the youth who was destined to raise so great a tempest in the world was transferred to Magdeburg and put into a Franciscan school. The institution was a sort of religio-gymnasium, where the tyrn was to be fed on a mixture of faith and the humanities. Here he had the first actual view of the Church as it was. Magdeburg was the seat of a bishopric, and was regarded as the church center of North Germany. Here, on a certain occasion, Luther saw the monk, Wilhelm von Anhalt, whom his father, a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 168 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 313g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123682864X
  • 9781236828644
  • 2,275,765