Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 12

Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 12

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...discovered that the fierce animosity so long existing between the Saxons of the South and the Anglo-Danes of the North had so far died away that the angry leaders could not precipitate a battle. Godwin and the king were obliged, by a popular sentiment, to make peace and to refer their difficulties to the lvitenagemot for settlement. But before the time of the meeting of that body the tide had so turned against Godwin that he was unable to sustain his cause, and he was banished. Together with his wife and three of his sons, he set sail for Flanders, where he was cordially received by Baldwin, count of that province. The princes Harold and Leofwin escaped from the western coast and made their way to Ireland. ' Having thus freed himself from the presence of the male members of the House of Godwin, the king next turned his anger upon his wife Editha, who, as will be re membered, was a daughter of the banished earl. From her Edward took away her estates and jewels, and then, when she was completely broken in spirit, confined her in the monastery of Vherwell. Thus, for the time, was the Saxon party overthrown and scattered. Relieved of the presence of his most formidable opponents, Edward gave free rein to his preference for the people and institutions of Normandy. The Norman nobles came over in great numbers, and settled at his court. Even Prince Vi.lliam, the illegitimate son of Duke Robert, availed himself of the opportunity to tarry for a season with Edward and his friends. Nor is it doubtful that this ambitious aspirant, who was destined to play so important a part in the history of medizeval England, was already, on the occasion of his visit, looking to the possibilities of the future. King Edward was childless, and it was said that he...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 216 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 395g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236896025
  • 9781236896025