Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 10

Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 10

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...There was thus, as nearly as practicable, an adaptation of all classes to the previous conditions existing in the state. As another conservative measure, the two kings were left undisturbed, but their prerogatives were reduced to a mere dignity and to leadership in war. The legislative power was given to two assemblies. The first and highest consisted of thirty members called the Gerontes, or " old men," of whom the kings were two, whatever might be their ages. The remaining twenty-eight must be over sixty years old. The right to originate all laws and measures of state polity belonged to this body. The other assembly embraced as members all male Spartans over the age of thirty. These met once a month and voted upon the measures proposed by the Gerontes. The voting was to be by acclamation, aye or no; and no debate was permissible. From the first all discussions and wrangling were odious to the Spartan spirit. _ The constitution of Lycurgus also established an overseership of six ErnORs, or magistrates. To them was intrusted a supervisory power over the laws passed by the assembly, and a final voice in all public matters. Even the kings were accountable to the Ephors for their conduct. The kingly oflice was thus so greatly hedged with restrictions as to be reduced to a minimum of influence, and in this shorn condition was permitted to survive in Sparta long after the complete destruction of royal prerogative in the other states of Greece. The Lycurgian statutes next proceeded to the education of the Spartans. The theory of the government was that all classes existed for the benefit of the state. The individual was for the commonwealth--nothing else. There has, perhaps, never been in all history another instance in which the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 313g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123687899X
  • 9781236878991