Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 1

Ridpath's Universal History; An Account of the Origin, Primitive Condition, and Race Development of the Greater Divisions of Mankind, and Also of the Principal Events in the Evolution and Progress of Nations from the Beginnings Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ... Indeed, it is this particular reasoning which has in Lemuria. Much scientific evidence may be adduced to strengthen the hyThe nature of pothesis. In the first place, -opicalbegin-a man is originally a tropical ning-animal. The very least that can be said is that he is by his nature semitropical in constitution and habits. We are obliged to select for him an original habitat corresponding with these conditions. Let us remark, once for all, that where these conditions have been maintained, there the race has invariably made least progress from its original state. The lowest forms of man-life are tropical. The most original types are found in those regions where the environment has prevented the evolution of the higher human varieties. In a word, the life of man seems in the tropical situation to have continued on the original plane, with little variation under the influences of physical nature. Not so, however, with those peoples who have departed from the original enDeveiopmentco-vironment. As soon as the unclothed primitive man, point of origin, covered with his delicate skin, made his way from his warm and equable climatic surroundings and began to be exposed, first to the vicissitudes, and further on to the rigors of higher latitudes, he began to acquire the discipline of nature, to be specialized in his faculties, quickened in his energies, and strengthened for battle with the op. posing forces of the material world. With this he began to rise in the scale of existence. The extreme distance of his departure is now measured by the span between the Papuan and the German. The significance of these facts is that human life began from some region where tropical or semitropical conditions prevailed, and that its progress has been coincident...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 156 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 290g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236536169
  • 9781236536167