A Review of Recent Attempts to Classify Birds; An Address Delivered Before the Second International Ornithological Congress on the 18th of May, 1891

A Review of Recent Attempts to Classify Birds; An Address Delivered Before the Second International Ornithological Congress on the 18th of May, 1891

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ...or incorrectness of my views; and it will be seen that I have not treated my subject quite on the same lines as those pursued by Reichenow and Fiirbringer. For this reason: by the model of the " tree" which is on the table, we see that Fiirbringer, and before him Reichenow, adopted the figurative notion of a tree literally; and this plan, excellent in every other respect, seems to me to fail in one particular, in that it subordinates the fact of the persistence of certain types to the present day. Such types may be of ancient differentiation--that no one may question; but the fact remains that they exist in our own Epoch. Thus, if it were possible, we should stand at the foot of the Avian tree--or, to speak more correctly, of the main Avian branch of the tree when the Birds had split off from the Reptiles. We could look up into the many spreading branches and twigs of "Aves," could note those which had died out or were expiring, and nowhere should we get this allegory more completely fulfilled than in the pictures of Fiirbringer. But the ornithological tree is a different one from a natural tree. It is one in which all the surviving branches have reached the same level, and the only difference in their appearance, as we see them on the topmost horizon, is that whereas one bough has struggled to the top, and many of its branches have died off in the process, another bough comes to the summit of the tree full of smaller branches and flourishing twigs. Thus we ought, if we wish to arrive at a knowledge of the present state of our ornithological tree, after standing at its base and studying the development of its many branches in different directions, to take a flight in an imaginary balloon, from which to look down upon the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123656569X
  • 9781236565693