Review of Forest Service Investigations Volume 2

Review of Forest Service Investigations Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...'The statistical data on which this report is based were collected by the Office of Wood Utilization. In the case of each standard product this calculated total is only slightly higher than that reported by Bureau of the Census Circular Forest Products No. 7, "Wood Distillation, 1909." It therefore seems safe to assume that the totals are probably not far from correct.1 However, the data can not be considered more than a careful estimate for several reasons: 1. Request for data was sent to 110 distillation plants, of which 61, or only 55 per cent, replied. Table 1.--Reported and estimated production of plants engaged in the destructive distillation of hardwoods. 2. A large number of the plants (a) either report their products as being sold to large agencies or to commission firms, (6) or state that they do not know what industry uses the product, (c) or fail to answer the questions. The fact that the products were sold to large holding companies probably is the reason for both (6) and (c). This is particularly true for both gray acetate of lime, of which 64 per cent is sold to one agency, and crude wood alcohol, of which 47.5 per cent is sold to one large refinery and 21.7 per cent to "other refineries." It is evident in both cases that the ultimate consuming industries could not be determined from the data given except by the method used. It is probable that both the price and production of gray acetate is controlled very largely by this one selling agency. However, in the case of crude wood alcohol the one large refining company and other similar companies probably serve more as central refiners, owing to the large amount of expensive apparatus necessary for that process, prohibiting its practice by the smaller plant...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236755286
  • 9781236755285