A Review of the First Fourteen Years of the Historical, Natural History and Library Society of South Natick, Mass; With the Field-Day Proceedings of 1881-1882-1883

A Review of the First Fourteen Years of the Historical, Natural History and Library Society of South Natick, Mass; With the Field-Day Proceedings of 1881-1882-1883

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ... the bitter cold, hundreds sick and many dying for the comforts of tWeir homes. And yet, submissive and uncomplaining under the cruel suspicion and harsh treatment, showing the spirit of Christian patience and forgiveness. And when, at last, the English reluctantly called upon them for help, in that life and death struggle, they sprang to their aid, and gave them the benefit of their sagacity and cunning in dealing with the wily foe, and proved faithful unto the end. It is said that it was this very element in the bloody fight which turned the scale in favor of the English, and saved their settlements from utter destruction; that had it not been for the 3,000 praying Indians of the Massachusetts and Plymouth colonies, thus withdrawn from Philip's support and many of them turned actively against him, it is not improbable that every Englishman would have perished or been driven from these shores. When we recall the suspicion and hostility with which these poor souls were regarded and the brutal outrages committed upon them in their peaceful homes; when we remember how strong must, have been the craving of their nature for the old savage life, and the ties which bound them to their brothers and friends leading on the bloody fray, it is amazing that they were not all drawn to Philip's side to become his efficient and faithful allies. And yet, it is not certainly proved that one was ever detected in any outrage against the English; we know that nine-tenths of them were utterly loyal to the English, and proved their most efficient aids, if not the salvation of their settlements in New England. After the war, the Indians were permitted to return to their villages. The English now believed that Eliot's work had been really effective in subduing and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 34 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236602250
  • 9781236602251