Revenue for the Philippine Islands; Hearings Before the Committee on the Philippines of the United States Senate, Fifty-Ninth Congress, First Session. March 19, 1906

Revenue for the Philippine Islands; Hearings Before the Committee on the Philippines of the United States Senate, Fifty-Ninth Congress, First Session. March 19, 1906

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ... peculiar to it. A number of these will be unskilled workmen, performing the ordinary manual labor around a concern of this kind, viz, shoveling beets, fuel, lime rock, etc.; others will be employed in work more or less skilled. The wages for skilled laborers range from $2 a day up to $5,000 or $6,000 per annum for the superintendent. For the lowest group of laborers I have used the term "unskilled;7' but, at the same time, as between first experience and that after becoming accustomed to the work there is a vast difference in the efficiency of such labor. To an extent, all of the workmen around a sugar factory are skilled. Advancement or promotion goes on all along the line, except possibly in the technical departments, such as chemistry, etc., where strictly technical scientific training is required. In a sense, the sugar factory is a school fitting men to accomplish its work. As already stated, in the beginning all the experts employed had to be imported. Since the establishment of the first factory, at Alvarado, Cal., we have been fitting men for this work. The volume and efficiency of labor has been growing constantly ever since. While it is best for a factory to hold on to its old employees, it can start a certain number of now men each year without serious consequences. This it will probably have to do if some new factory requiring expert work men tenders positions to some of its trained men at higher wages. Consequently, there is still large room for improvement in the supply and quality of our factory workmen. The question of developing and maintaining the supply of laborers for the beet fields is of equal importance and is certainly a much larger problem. The minimum number of laborers around an ordinary factory is about 200. For...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 616 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 31mm | 1,084g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236652657
  • 9781236652652