Return to an Address Dated 26 March 1852; A Copy of Report of Finance Committee of the Executive Council of Ceylon, Transmitted to the Secretary of St

Return to an Address Dated 26 March 1852; A Copy of Report of Finance Committee of the Executive Council of Ceylon, Transmitted to the Secretary of St

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ... the law and the means of rendering it in Ceylon what it should be everywhere, a permanent, uniform and universal rule of conduct. (4.) The state of pleading and practice, and the mode of securing uniformity and improvement therein. Let us devote a single paragraph to the consideration of each of these important subjects. 35. By the charter the Supreme Court is required to hold a civil and criminal ses-circuits, sions twice at least every year, at each district town. On these circuits, criminal cases of a serious nature are tried before the circuit judge and a jury of 13 men; and after the conclusion of the criminal business, the civil appeals are heard before the same judge and three assessors. The Supreme Comt, as is known, consists of three judges only, and it lias never been found practicable since the Charter came into operation, to have more than two circuits in a year. It would, however, certainly be most desirable, were it feasible, that conviction should sooner follow the perpetration of the crime. Truth is far more readily discoverable when the trial takes place shortly after the offence has been committed, than if it be delayed for six months, or in case of a postponement (which in a country like this is frequently unavoidable) for a year. So, too, the great use and object of punishment would be much better attained, if the sentence were pronounced against the criminal whilst the particulars of this crime were still fresh in the memories of his countrymen. In those cases also in which accused persons either cannot find bail, or are accused of capital crimes, and not admitted to bail, there is necessarily, at present, a long incarceration before trial, hard upon the accused, if innocent, and always expensive to the country, which a more...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 202 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 372g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236544153
  • 9781236544155