The Retrospect of Practical Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 114

The Retrospect of Practical Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 114 : Being a Half-Yearly Journal Containing a Retrospective View of Every Discovery and Practical Improvement in the Medical Sciences; January, 1897 (Classic Reprint)

By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

Excerpt from The Retrospect of Practical Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 114: Being a Half-Yearly Journal Containing a Retrospective View of Every Discovery and Practical Improvement in the Medical Sciences; January, 1897 AS a therapeutic measure, Kast would very much recommend the cooling bath. He would, however, in very sensitive people, occasional y substitute for the bath medium doses of quinine. All other antipyretics only have a symptomatic nerve efi'ect. Prof. Binz Spoke about quinine, which to him seemed the most prominent antipyretic. Quinine acts as an antipyretic by its Influence on cells, and acts as well on the leucocytes as on the organic cells, reducing their ability to absorb oxygen and using this for the purpose Of raising the temperature. Quinine Is a Special and encral antipyretic. The author reminds us that he had introduced the treatment Of t phoid fever by baths, quinine and alcohol in the seventies. Alicylic acid favours an increase of the blood temperature, in the vapour bath both an increase of uric acid, and an increase in the number of leucocytes. Antipyrin (also antifebrin and phenacetin) produce their action through the brain. In isolation (aronsohn and Sachs) quinine has no power, salicylic acid very little, while antipyrin promptly reduces the temperature. It favours an increase of uric acid, an equalisation of the urates, an increase of heat production in the body, and an increase of heat rays. Tannin, which is greatly opposed to bacteria, probably has the same action as quinine. Alcohol, where it influences temperature, does SO only b decreasing it. The heart is stimulated by alcohol, whio enables it to force the blood current to the surface of the body, where it comes in contact with the external temperature, and is thus cooled off. To this is added the antiseptic quality of the alcohol, which is antagonistic to the poison Of the bacteria Of putrefaction. Through its chemical action, also, a ost-mortem rise Of temperature does not take place. Furt ermore the diuretic effect of alcohol is to be considered, which is particularly Of use in the rapid elimination of toxines, in the absence of diuresis in fevers. The ingestion Of water is also necessary to flush the kidneys, whose ducts have been opened by the alcohol. (taken from a report of a discussion in t e 14th Congress for Internal Medicine, Der Kinderarzt, 1896, vii., 73. Pediatrics, September, 15. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 476 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 24mm | 630g
  • Forgotten Books
  • United States
  • English
  • , black & white illustrations
  • 0243062427
  • 9780243062423