The Retrospect of Practical Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 106

The Retrospect of Practical Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 106 : Being a Half-Yearly Journal Containing a Retrospective View of Every Discovery and Practical Improvement in the Medical Sciences (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from The Retrospect of Practical Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 106: Being a Half-Yearly Journal Containing a Retrospective View of Every Discovery and Practical Improvement in the Medical Sciences At the time I speak of, quinine was the only antipyretic drug in use, and I worked away with it both alone and in combination with the bath ing treatment. I frequently gave ten grains every three hours during the day of twenty-four hours - eighty grains in twenty-four hours - and some times I gave single large doses of thirty or forty grains in the evening, as it is very important in the use of antipyretics to go with the tide, so to speak - that is, to give them before there is a natural tendency to decline of temperature. It is much easier to increase a natural remission of tem perature than to diminish a natural exacerbation of fever. I may be allowed a slight digression to state that I did not, as a rule, observe any injurious result from the use of these large doses of quinine. Two patients became comatose after taking ten grains every three hours for several days, but both ultimately recovered. Occasionally, after a time, vomiting set in, and the drug had to be discontinued. Once after keeping the temperature absolutely normal for a week by the administration of quinine only, in the middle of the fastigium of an exceptionally severe case of typhoid in a girl, vomiting set in, and I could not go on with the treatment. Immediately the temperature rose again, and became as high as ever. Ten days or so later, the fastigium having continued its severe course without Sign of abatement, and vomiting having ceased soon after stoppage of the quinine treatment, I again resumed quinine, this time with apparently the happiest result, for normal defervescence very speedily set in. Quinine formed a useful ally to the water treatment, and enabled me in severe cases to diminish the number of baths very considerably. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 344 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 18mm | 458g
  • Forgotten Books
  • English
  • 77 Illustrations; Illustrations, black and white
  • 0243092032
  • 9780243092031