Results of the Magnetical, Nautical, and Meteorological Observations Made and Collected at the Flagstaff Observatory, Melbourne, and at Various Stations in the Colony of Victoria; March 1858, to February 1859

Results of the Magnetical, Nautical, and Meteorological Observations Made and Collected at the Flagstaff Observatory, Melbourne, and at Various Stations in the Colony of Victoria; March 1858, to February 1859

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...25th. 151. MONTH OF FEBRUARY, 1859. Melboume.--Only a slight positive electrical tension manifested itself during the first part of this month, from the 2nd to the 9th; the mean value then increased, and remained comparatively high for the remainder of the month, although subject to great oscillations. The maximum value in the daily means was obtained on the 22nd, and the minimum on the 3rd; the former amounted to 3'95, and the latter to 0'55. On the 9th, two distant claps of thunder were heard, at 3" 35"'-p.m. On the 20th, between 7"-and 8'" p.m., lightning was seen towards N.W. On the 21st, at 3"-a.m., thunder and lightning towards W. and N. 152. The following table contains the mean positive electric tension, calculated for each month; also, the number of negative and naught registrations made, the number of days on which thunderstorms were recorded, and the number on which lightning only was observed, at the Flagstafl' Observatory, Melbourne: 153. One of the first steps taken, when the labors of the Observatory were in a fair state of organization, was an arrangement for advancing the interest of Navigation. The chief points in view being the collection of ships' logs, for the purpose of extracting therefrom facts, which might be made available for developing our theories on the principal meteorological questions and their systematic examination, according to a plan adopted for the advancement of our knowledge on the Currents of the Ocean and Atmosphere; and lastly, the assistance which an observatory might render to masters of ships, by giving an opportunity of having their instruments corrected, and information supplied on the scientific portions of Navigation. 154. How evident soever the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236860705
  • 9781236860705