Rest and Pain; A Course of Lectures on the Influence of Mechanical and Physiological Rest in the Treatment of Accidents and Surgical Diseases, and the Diagnostic Value of Pain

Rest and Pain; A Course of Lectures on the Influence of Mechanical and Physiological Rest in the Treatment of Accidents and Surgical Diseases, and the Diagnostic Value of Pain

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ... practically exemplified, some years ago, by my friend Dr. Daldy. He asked me to see with him a patient--Sir Benjamin Brodie saw him afterwards--who had extensive cancer in the rectum. This gentleman surgeon is usually more clearly marked, but here too the presence of peritonitis may be masked as in the subjects of constitutional syphilis. I remember the case of a sailor admitted with an obscure swelling in the right side; opinions were divided as to whether this was intra-abdominal, or deeply seated in the abdominal wall. On the latter supposition the nature of the swelling was explored, and was then found to be a gummatous tumour in the liver. After three days the patient sank with scarcely any evidence of peritonitis, though after death this was found to be clearly pronounced and abundant. In diagnosing the existence of this condition, sometimes a rise of temperature, abdominal distension, especially a tympanitis, which stealthily but steadily increases, and a gradual pinching of the features would appear to be far more trustworthy than pain, a symptom which, on account of its not infrequent absence, seems to me to be not reliable.--ed. had considerable pain in the colon, and spasmodic contraction of the abdominal walls associated with his rectal disease, and he suffered a great deal of pain at night, so as to deprive him of his sleep. For the purpose of procuring sleep, it was essential that he should take opium; it was administered by the mouth, but the opium thus taken destroyed his appetite. Here was a patient suffering from cancer, tight abdomen, and pain, and we were giving him op'um, and destroying his appetite. Well, it was suggested that, instead of giving him opium by the mouth, we might possibly relieve him by rubbing the opium into...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 176 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123651291X
  • 9781236512918