The Responsibilities of Online Service Providers
12%
off

The Responsibilities of Online Service Providers

5 (1 rating by Goodreads)

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

This volume focuses on the responsibilities of online service providers (OSPs) in contemporary societies. It examines the complexity and global dimensions of the rapidly evolving and serious challenges posed by the exponential development of Internet services and resources. It looks at the major actors - such as Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Yahoo! - and their significant influence on the informational environment and users' interactions within it, as well as the responsibilities and liabilities such influence entails. It discusses the position of OSPs as information gatekeepers and how they have gone from offering connecting and information-sharing services to paying members to providing open, free infrastructure and applications that facilitate digital expression and the communication of information. The book seeks consensus on the principles that should shape OSPs' responsibilities and practices, taking into account business ethics and policies. Finally, it discusses the rights of users and international regulations that are in place or currently lacking.
show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 347 pages
  • 155 x 235 x 20.57mm | 6,565g
  • Cham, Switzerland
  • English
  • 1st ed. 2017
  • 5 Illustrations, color; 6 Illustrations, black and white; VII, 347 p. 11 illus., 5 illus. in color.
  • 3319478516
  • 9783319478517
  • 1,647,434

Back cover copy

This volume focuses on the responsibilities of online service providers (OSPs) in contemporary societies. It examines the complexity and global dimensions of the rapidly evolving and serious challenges posed by the exponential development of Internet services and resources. It looks at the major actors - such as Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Yahoo! - and their significant influence on the informational environment and users' interactions within it, as well as the responsibilities and liabilities such influence entails. It discusses the position of OSPs as information gatekeepers and how they have gone from offering connecting and information-sharing services to paying members to providing open, free infrastructure and applications that facilitate digital expression and the communication of information. The book seeks consensus on the principles that should shape OSPs' responsibilities and practices, taking into account business ethics and policies. Finally, it discusses the rights of users and international regulations that are in place or currently lacking.
show more

Table of contents

Chapter1. Introduction New Civic Responsibilities for Online Service Providers (Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi).- Part I: Responsibilities and liabilities.- Chapter2. The Debate on the Moral Responsibilities of Online Service Providers (Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi).- Chapter 3. The Immunity of Internet Intermediaries reconsidered? (Gerogios N. Yannopoulos).- Chapter 4. Is Google responsible for providing fair and unbiased results? (Dirk Lewandowski).- Chapter 5. We are the victim here - Data breach notification duties and the duties of victims in the criminal law of democratic states (Burkhard Schafer).- Chapter 6. Did the Romans get it right? A legal analysis of what Google, eBay, UPC TeleKabel Wien and Delfi have in common (Peggy Valcke).- PartII: Business ethics & corporate social responsibilities.- Chapter 7. Responsibilities of OSPs from a Business Ethics Point of View (Christoph Luetge).- Chapter 8. Myth or promise? The corporate social responsibilities of online service providers for human rights (Emily Laidlaw).- Chapter 9. Online service providers - a new and unique species of the firm? (Robert Wentrup).- Chapter 10. Online service providers as human rights arbiters (Rikke Frank Jorgensen & Anja Moller Pedersen).- Chapter 11. Licensing of user-generated content: why less is mores (Milos Novovic).- Part III: Users' rights & international regulations.- Chapter12. Online service providers' liability, copyright infringement and freedom of expression. Could Europe learn from Canada? (Federica Giovanella).- Chapter 13. Non-financial disclosures in the tech sector: furthering the trend (Peter Micek & Deniz Duru Aydin).- Chapter 14. Should we treat Big Data as a public good? (Katarzyna Sledziewska, Renata Wloch).- Chapter 15. Internet intermediaries as responsible actors? Why it is time to rethink the e-Commerce Directive as well (Sophie Stalla-Bourdillon).- Chapter 16. Towards fostering compliance by design, drawing designers into the regulatory frame (Ewa Lurger).- Part IV: Commentaries.- Chapter 17. Does great power come with great responsibility? The need to talk about Corporate Political Responsibility (Dennis Broeders & Linnet Taylor).- Chapter 18. The Economic Impact of Online Intermediaries (Hosuk Lee-Makiyama and Rositsa Georgieva).- Chapter 19. Online Service Providers and ethical disclosure in sales (Jennifer Baker).
show more

About Mariarosaria Taddeo

Mariarosaria Taddeo is Researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, Faculty Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute, and Junior Research Fellow at St Cross College, University of Oxford. Her area of expertise is Information and Computer Ethics, although she has worked on issues concerning Philosophy of Information, Epistemology, and Philosophy of AI. She published articles focusing on online trust, cyber security, and cyber warfare and guest-edited a number of special issues of peer-reviewed international journals. She also edited (with Luciano Floridi) a volume on `The Ethics of Information Warfare' (Springer, 2014) and is currently writing a book on `The Ethics of Cyber Conflicts' under contract for Routledge. Dr. Taddeo is the 2010 recipient of the Simon Award for Outstanding Research in Computing and Philosophy and of the 2013 World Technology Award for Ethics. She serves as editor-in-chief of Minds & Machines and in the executive editorial board of Philosophy & Technology.



Luciano Floridi is Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford and Director of Research of the Oxford Internet Institute. His most recent book is The Fourth Revolution - How the infosphere is reshaping human reality (2014 and 2016). He is a member of the EU's Ethics Advisory Group on Ethical Dimensions of Data Protection, of Google Advisory Board on "the right to be forgotten", and Chairman of the Ethics Advisory Board of the European Medical Information Framework. Among his recognitions, he has been elected Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow by the European University Institute; awarded the Catedras de Excelencia Prize by the University Carlos III of Madrid, was the UNESCO Chair in Information and Computer Ethics, and Gauss Professor of the Academy of Sciences in Goettingen. He is a recipient of the MEA's J. Ong Award, the APA's Barwise Prize, the IACAP's Covey Award, and the INSEIT's Weizenbaum Award. He is a Fellow of the AISB, the BCS, and the Academie Internationale de Philosophie des Sciences.
show more

Rating details

1 rating
5 out of 5 stars
5 100% (1)
4 0% (0)
3 0% (0)
2 0% (0)
1 0% (0)
Book ratings by Goodreads
Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book. Close X