The Reptiles of Western North America; An Account of the Species Known to Inhabit California and Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, British Columbia, Sonora and Lower California Volume 2

The Reptiles of Western North America; An Account of the Species Known to Inhabit California and Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, British Columbia, Sonora and Lower California Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ...River 20 miles above Myrtle Point, Myrtle Point), Douglas (Camas Mountains, Cow Creek, Drain), Curry (Sixes River, Port Orford, Elk Creek, Flores Creek, Rogue River, Corbin, Goldbeach, Harbor) counties. From California, from Del Norte (Smith River, Gasquet, Crescent City, Requa) county. Remarks.--This is the common garter-snake of the northwest coast. It is of small size. The largest specimen examined measures 590 mm. to base of tail. The head is small, not so distinct from the neck as in other races, and the labials are reduced in number. The coloration is very variable. The dorsal line frequently is absent or developed only on the neck. The lateral lines also may be absent. Specimens may be heavily spotted or without any marking, either lines or spots. The dorsal line usually is yellow, but may be red, and there often is red elsewhere in the coloration, as on the gastrosteges. The lower surfaces often are dark, and the coloration everywhere may be very dusky. Specimens with heavy spotting and dark pigmentation of the gastrosteges resemble T. o. =ovagrans, but usually may be easily distinguished by their scale characters. Specimens showing no dorsal line resemble T. o. couchii, but here again the scale characters are quite difierent. The closest relationship of this sub-species undoubtedly is with T. o. atratus, yet there can be no doubt as to the subspecific distinctness of the two forms. The difierences in the number of superior and inferior labials, scale-rows and gastrosteges should be sufficient aid toward their correct determination, and the general appearance usually is quite difierent. Certain specimens, however, are so nearly intermediate in one or more of their characters that students might differ in opinion as to their...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 98 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 191g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236902300
  • 9781236902306