Reports of Special Subjects a -F

Reports of Special Subjects a -F

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ...same mountain. Such arguments, however, only go to show that certain timbers are best adapted to certain climates, and that originally there would be no forest at all on a piece of ground not naturally adapted to a forest growth, or that whatever forest did appear, would be the one best adapted to the soil, temperature. and other conditions of growth. But they by no means show, or tend to show, that a given wide range of country would be exactly the same, so far as climate is concerned, whether it were barren or covered with heavy forests. This subject, in its details, however, even were it properly a part of my discussion, is too complicated for further notice, and demands more investiga tion than I could give to it. A course of long and careful inquiry in this, direction, by some able meteorologist and botanist, would be of almost incalculable benefit. TIMBER IN DETAIL. I shall now proceed to give in detail an account of the timbers to be found in the counties under discussion, and their local variations. In the immediate vicinity of Princeton the principal timbers noted were bartram oak, white ash, red oak, black oak, swamp white oak, sugar-tree (black), black hickory, white hickory, and liriodendron (yellow poplar). Bartram oak is seldom found, except in low, damp soils, or along streams; but near Princeton considerable quantities appear in a flat woodland quite high and dry. A large per centage of white ash also appears in the same woodland, which lies about one mile from Princeton. I/Vith the exception of this woodland, the timbers are mostly cleared away for two or three miles around. The formation is Sub-carboniferous limestone, of Chester Group on high ground, and of St. Louis limestone on low grounds. In going toward Eddyville, .show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236922131
  • 9781236922137