Reports of Special Assistant Poor Law Commissioners on the Employment of Women and Children in Agriculture; Presented to Both Houses of Parliament

Reports of Special Assistant Poor Law Commissioners on the Employment of Women and Children in Agriculture; Presented to Both Houses of Parliament

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ...About the same time, boys and women are employed in couching the land, -. e., picking out the roots and weeds. Boys are hired for this at eight years old sometimes, and earn 5rf. or Ad. a-day. The women get from 10rf. to Is. Boys are very commonly set to keep birds off the corn. When the seed is sown, for about three weeks until the corn rises out of the ground, one boy may keep 20 acres or more. They begin to do this at years old. Boys do not go upon the corn-land from this time until the summer, at the latter end of May or beginning of June, when the hoeing and pulling of weeds comes on; all farmers do not practise this, but it is generally done by women and boys. Boys do this from 8 years old to 14, and get, according to their ages, from 3d. to 6d. a-day. The women have l0rf. a-day; this kind of labour lasts for a month. At corn-harvest the boys, as well as women, reap with the men. The man contracts to reap at so much an acre, at from 10. to 12s, according to the crop, and gets his wife and children to help him. The boys begin to do this at about 12 years of age; a boy at this time of life will reap about a quarter of an acre in two days, while a man would be reaping three-quarters of an acre in the same time, and a woman half an acre, if she worked as many hours as the man, but this is seldom the case. The man and boy go to work generally about five o'clock, and leave off at dark. The common rule is, you should not leave off reaping till you could see a star; but the woman goes a-field about seven or eight in the morning and works till about six. It is hard work for men and boys. Boys do not use the bagging-hook, for which the man gets about 2. or 2. 6rf. more by the acre than for reaping it. In this case the women bind the corn, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 198 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 363g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236646037
  • 9781236646033