Reports of Explorations and Surveys to Ascertain the Most Practicable and Economical Route for a Railroad from the Mississipi River to the Pacific Ocean Volume 9

Reports of Explorations and Surveys to Ascertain the Most Practicable and Economical Route for a Railroad from the Mississipi River to the Pacific Ocean Volume 9

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1858 edition. Excerpt: ...SWAINSON, Zool. Jour. Ill, Nov. 1827, 350. Type Lorie ccerulea, L. Coccobm-us, SWAINSON, Class. Birds, ll, 1837, 277. Same type. Z? Goniaphca, Bownlcn, " Excursions in Madeira, 1825," Agassiz. Type Lorie ludoviciana, L. according to Gray. Hobie, RIICHENBACH, Av. Syst. Nat. 1850; plate xxviii. Type Lorin ludoviciana, L.-, not Habia, Lesson, 1831. Hedymeles, CABANIS, Mus. Hein. 1851, 153. Same type. Bill very large, nearly as high as long; the culmen curved, with a rather sharp ridge; the commissure conspicuously angulated just below the nostril, the posterior leg of the angle nearly as long as the anterior, both nearly straight. Lower jaw deeper thun the upper, and extending much behind the forehead; the width greater than the length of the gonys, considerably wider than the upper jaw. A prominent knob in the roof of the mouth. Tarsi shorter than the middle toe; the outer toe a little longer, reaching not quite to the base of the middle claw-, hind toe rather longer than to this base. Wings long, reaching the middle of the tail; the secondaries and tertials nearly equal; the second quill longest; the first less than the fourth. Tail very nearly even, shorter than the wings. 1 The following extract from a letter received from Doctor Michener, dated December 23, 1857, contains some interesting details respecting this species: " The accompanying paragraph, taken from my note-book, contains the information you desire respectingTownsend's bunting. The bird was killed by Mr. Townsend himself, in an old field grown up with cedar bushes, near New Garden, Chester county, within halfa mile of the New Garden meeting house: " May 11, l833.----This morning J. K. Townsend, in company with John Richards, shot a bunting in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 540 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 28mm | 953g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236968271
  • 9781236968272