Reports of the Decisions of the Judges for the Trial of Election Petitions in Ontario; Relating to Elections to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, 1871-5-9, and to the House of Commons of Canada, 1874-8

Reports of the Decisions of the Judges for the Trial of Election Petitions in Ontario; Relating to Elections to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, 1871-5-9, and to the House of Commons of Canada, 1874-8

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ...would see the Council had the laying out of the money. The statement of Sufferin is distinctly coupled with the exercise of his right of voting; the statement of the respondent is in no way connected with it. The statement of Sutferin shows a promise by the respondent; the statement of the respondent shows a hope only expressed by Sufferin. The statement by Sufferin shows a personal inducement held out by the respondent to Sufferin for his support; the statement of the respondent shows a mere hope expressed by Sufferin that the Council would get whatever advantage there was in laying out the appropriation, but at the same time they would have that as distinct from the election. The one statement is a corrupt offer or promise by the candidate of personal gain to the elector, in consideration of support at the election being given; the other statement is a mere hope dissevered from the election, expressed by the voter to the candidate, that the respondent would sec the Council were allowed to appropriate the money. And the question is, "Which account of the conversation should l accept?" If this stood by itself, as before stated, oath against oath, and each side equally credible, and no collateral or accompanying circumstances to aid me either way, I should hold the charge not to be proved. But the other charges, if severally sworn to by a credible witness, and the united weight of their testimony is to overcome the effect of the respondents unsupported word, I may be obliged to attach such a degree of importance to the combined testimony of these witnesses, as to hold the charges to which they severally speak as sufficiently proved in law, against the opposing testimony of the respondent. I shall, before forming any opinion on...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 316 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 567g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236855108
  • 9781236855107